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Matilda Jesiolowski

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Outspoken body-positivity activist Jameela Jamil calls for change by addressing the harmful behaviours of reality stars and the media on our body image and self-esteem.

The tide is changing when it comes to body positivity. Where low self-esteem once dominated and allowed for the media to spread messages of weight loss, there are now many people challenging these ideas and calling for the removal of body shaming.

British actor and star of The Good Place Jameela Jamil is an increasingly loud and insistent voice when it comes to challenging the standards of physical beauty perpetuated by the media and entertainment industry.

Jamil is outspoken on social media when it comes to body positivity and calling out celebrities who encourage unhealthy body image ideals.

She recently shared an image to Instagram showing off the stretch marks on her breasts, announcing that she would now call them ‘Babe Marks’.

Jamil is outspoken on social media when it comes to body positivity and calling out celebrities who encourage unhealthy body image ideals.

“Boob stretch marks are a normal, beautiful thing,” she captioned her post. “I have stretch marks all over my body and I hereby rename them all Babe Marks. They are a sign my body dared to take up extra space in a society that demands our eternal thinness.”

These comments are a welcome dose of honesty and frankness in a world where women are conditioned to be ashamed of such things.

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bvt4ccCBbdr/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

“[Stretch marks] are a sign my body dared to take up extra space in a society that demands our eternal thinness.”

Her tweets about Photoshop and airbrushing advertising campaigns in the media, calling for them to become illegal also went viral. She banned the use of Photoshop on herself, explaining that the practice is not only harmful for the audience, but also for her own self-image.

She banned the use of Photoshop on herself, explaining that the practice is not only harmful for the audience, but also for her own self-image.

Recently, Jamil called out Khloe Kardashian on social media after the reality star promoted weight loss products to her millions of followers on Instagram.

“It’s incredibly awful that this industry bullied you until you became this fixated on your appearance,” wrote Jamil. “But now please don’t put that back into the world and hurt other girls the way you have been hurt. You’re a smart woman. Be smarter than this.”

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Tea, for lack of a better word. #CommentsByCelebs

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Jamil is adamant in the fight against body shaming, which comes from her own personal experiences of body dysmorphia, eating disorders and incessant bullying she received as a teenager.

Jamil recently launched her “I Weigh” campaign, a social media movement where she encourages women to describe their qualities and accomplishments rather than their appearances.

Jamil is adamant in the fight against body shaming.

Beginning as a single powerful message shared on Instagram, it has since turned into a movement after thousands of other women also began sharing their own powerful messages after becoming sick and tired of their worth being measured by their weight.

When a powerful, athletic photograph of AFLW player Tayla Harris went viral, the last thing she expected was online abuse and an onslaught of sexualised comments, triggering a response about sexism in sport.

AFL Women’s player Tayla Harris was the subject of an image that became the centre of an online trolling storm in women’s sport, which has now received a viral response.

A photo was taken of her with her legs spread widely in mid-kick of the opening goal for her team, Carlton, in a weekend game for the AFLW league. It drew much attention, being described as showing a great athlete at her most powerful that many saw as inspirational.

It drew much attention, being described as showing a great athlete at her most powerful that many saw as inspirational.

However, in a way that is all too familiar in women’s sport, the image was bombarded with sexualised, misogynistic comments, and the post was removed from the Seven Network’s social media. Many were quick to criticise the Network, claiming that the photo itself wasn’t the problem, but the attitude of those who left abusive and horrible comments.

In a way that is all too familiar in women’s sport, the image was bombarded with sexualised, misogynistic comments.

Eventually reposting the image, Seven apologised. Claiming that the removal had sent the wrong message, they said they would continue to celebrate women’s footy. “Our intention was to highlight [Tayla Harris’] incredible athleticism,” They said.

It was too little, too late. Many condemned the network’s handling of the online abuse, arguing that erasing the picture rather than the comments had caused even more damage.

Harris said she felt that she had been subjected to sexual abuse on social media. “Here’s a pic of me at work… think about this before your derogatory comments, animals,” Harris responded to the trolls.

The now infamous photo has since sparked a passionate social media response from many wanting to show solidarity and support. The #TaylaKickChallenge began, with thousands posting to social media an image of their replication of the kick, with Harris saying she would pick a winner herself.

https://twitter.com/taylaharriss/status/1111122493484339200

“Things have changed… if you’re not with us, you will be left behind.”

The image of Harris is now infamous, not because of the ugly misogyny that it created but because of the celebration and show of support it inspired. Harris thanked her supporters, in a message; “Things have changed… if you’re not with us, you will be left behind.”

Children all around the world left the classroom to take to the streets in the School Strike for Climate, despite receiving criticism from teachers, parents and even our top politicians. So, why did our kids risk punishment to take action for the environment?

We recently saw school children around the world united in one common goal: save our planet. In over 112 countries, kids skipped school on Friday March 15 to take to the streets in the School Strike for Climate, demanding governments take action on an issue that will affect the course of their futures.

Many teachers, parents and politicians raised objection, insisting that the children stay in school instead. Prime Minister Scott Morrison told parliament, “We do not support our schools being turned into parliaments… what we want is more learning in schools and less activism.”

Despite drawing criticism, the school strike did make people take notice of the issue in a way that hasn’t before and forced many to beg the question: why are the kids coming together to take action on climate change?

Many teachers, parents and politicians raised objection, insisting that the children stay in school instead.

It was Greta Thunberg, a 16-year-old climate activist from Sweden who inspired the more than 1.4 million young people to campaign on climate action this month. Her solo protest outside Swedish parliament last August is what prompted the global movement. “We proved that it does matter what you do and that no one is too small to make a difference,” Thunberg says.

Citing a belief in equality and climate justice as their reason to skip school, those who took part in the march called for a dramatic reduction in greenhouse emissions from their respective countries.

“We proved that it does matter what you do and that no one is too small to make a difference”

Young people, it seems, are the ones taking to the streets due to the lack of action from world leaders. Many, like Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, are under the impression that the adults have left this environmental mess for the children to clean up. With a belief that the press and politicians seem to be ignoring the issue, the youth are taking action into their own hands.

Young people, it seems, are the ones taking to the streets due to the lack of action from world leaders.

Whether you agree with the actions of the climate strike or not, one thing is undeniably clear. The united action around the globe reveals the solidarity of young people that are concerned about the environment. If a united strike such as this created as much conversation and debate as it did, then perhaps the time has come to listen to the kids and start doing something to act when it comes to the future of our planet.

The #MeToo movement has exploded into the global conversation in recent years, supporting victims of sexual harassment and empowering them to speak up. As parents, there is now an obligation to educate our kids and empower them to be strong, respectful and educated young boys and girls.

The #MeToo movement started in 2017, when accusations against Hollywood mogul producer Harvey Weinstein created a ripple effect within the entertainment industry regarding sexual harassment and assault. Since then, the movement has trickled down into all layers of society. In the age of #MeToo, how do we help our children to navigate this social landscape and raise them to fearlessly tackle the world in the hope of a fairer future?

The movement has sent shockwaves through the workplace, encouraging women to speak up in the wake of sexual harassment and has also ignited movements such as #TimesUp. The initiative lays its intent bare in the first sentence on its website, which reads, “The clock has run out on sexual assault, harassment, and inequality in the workplace.”

“The clock has run out on sexual assault, harassment, and inequality in the workplace.”

Since the explosion of both #MeToo and #TimesUp into the public conversation, women who had been sexually harassed or assaulted shared their stories all over the world. The movements, which are driven by social media, have changed the conversation by allowing women who once felt like victims to feel empowered to stand up for themselves.

#MeToo has changed the conversation by allowing women who once felt like victims to feel empowered to stand up for themselves.

#MeToo isn’t only about women, and it isn’t only about adults. In the midst of this changing cultural landscape, there comes no better time to teach our children about empathy, relationships, consent and communication. The focus should not only be on raising strong, empowered girls; but also on raising respectful, caring young boys.

The focus should not only be on raising strong, empowered girls; but also on raising respectful, caring young boys.

Tips for raising empowered boys and girls: 

  1. Talk to your children about consent.

Teach your girls to set boundaries and teach your boys to respect them. Have open conversations that foster values of empathy, communication and respect. As a child, consent begins with ‘no means no’. It means teaching them to set boundaries, but also to respect boundaries set by others. It is not only the job for the girl to make a boy or man respect her. It’s these lessons that also need to be taught early to boys.

  1. Encourage both your sons and daughters to be upstanding for gender justice.

The time of #MeToo has been remarkable in the march towards gender equality. A recent study found that engaging with traditional ‘girl’ toys and entertainment (most notably Disney Princesses) can lead to reinforced gender stereotypes and increased vulnerability. Have open conversations with your children about these gender roles and encourage them to engage in all sorts of activities. Girls who play sports, wrestle and build Lego, as well as play with dolls, have a diversified notion of what ‘girls’ do and are therefore more likely to perceive themselves as strong, confident and assertive.

On the other hand, boys are taught to be tough, never cry and always be strong. As parents, we should strive not to reinforce stereotypes that indicate boys are ‘weak’ if they cry or feel emotions. Teach boys, as well as girls, that humans experience millions of emotions and its okay to feel the full range of them.

  1. Educate yourself

It is most important that our children have strong role models to look up to and guide the way in which they perceive themselves, gender stereotypes and social cues.

Of course, these simple tips won’t solve the problem or completely eradicate any notion of sexual harassment in the world that our children will grow up in – but it’s a start. If the next generation of children are instilled with these lessons from the beginning, then perhaps attitudes will change and the problem will be lessened in the future.

With the implementation of the ‘Bring Your Own Device’ (BYOD) initiative in many Australian schools, questions have been raised over the impact of technology in the classroom.

In recent years, an increasing number of Australian schools have begun to implement “Bring Your Own Device” (BYOD) schemes.

However, with this new trend an issue arises of whether this introduction of more technology will impact student learning. It raises the question as to whether it could be distracting students more than helping them.

What is BYOD?

This concept originated in the business world, with companies allowing employees to use their personal smartphones, laptops, tablets and other technological devices in the workplace. The initiative has since gained popularity in the education sector with a number of schools encouraging students to bring their own personal devices to use in the classroom.

What are the issues?

With this new trend have come many issues associated with it – such as financial concerns; technological infrastructure; teacher training; privacy; and network security. The issue of equity is seen as a major issue in any discussion of BYOD, as not all students can afford their own iPad.

Not all students can afford their own iPad.

The issue that requires the most consideration is that of the impact on student’s learning as a result of this increase in technology within the classroom, and the potential distractions that come with it.

The pros and cons

While questions have been raised on the impact of BYOD programs, there are many benefits of the initiative. One study outlined these benefits which include:

  • High levels of student engagement through interactive assignments,
  • The use of a range of online apps to help teach core curriculum skills and independent learning activities,
  • The contribution to more flexible and collaborative learning experiences.

However, there are arguments for the implications of the rise of BYOD programs. The issue of distraction is a big one. A survey of teachers found that more than 70% feel that students’ devices were having a detrimental effect on their attention span.

With the new opportunity for learning apps at their fingertips, students now also have constant access to social media and the distractions and dangers that this can bring. YouTube, Facebook, Instagram and other sources of entertainment can be tempting distractions for students that could otherwise detract from time that could be spent on learning activities.

With the new opportunity for learning apps at their fingertips, students now also have constant access to social media.

Utilising BYOD

Despite potential impacts, it is inevitable that technology is going to play a larger role in our children’s lives, both at home and in the classroom. It should therefore be an integral part of their learning. The issue is how to understand the role of BYOD in education, and consider ways for educators and parents alike to utilise their benefits as learning tools rather than thinking of them as a diversion.