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KIDS / May ‘2017

10 Things to Do When Your Child is Being Bullied

KIDS / MAY ‘2017

10 Things to Do When Your Child is Being Bullied

A common fear among parents is that their child isn’t treated fairly. Their home life might be accepting and comfortable, but you can’t control the environment at school. While bullying is an issue rampant across schools, there are ways to handle it and minimise the problem. Here’s ten ways you can address the problem of your child being bullied.

Words Priya Clark

1. Make sure your child’s teachers are aware of the problem. Teachers need to be informed of the issue so they can watch out for any bullying.

2. Show that you’re taking the problem seriously by listening to your child about the bulling incidents. Showing initiative is important.

3. Discuss your child’s day at school on a regular basis, and prompt them to open up about the bullying. Is it happening again? Is it even worse than before?

4. Encourage self-confidence. By teaching them to be confident you can encourage your children to seek help from teachers and peers, and to ignore any harsh words thrown their way.

5. Have a safe space for them at home. Their home life doesn’t have to be as stressful as their school environment, so make them feel secure and loved.

6. Surround them with other children they can connect with. While providing a safe home environment can certainly be helpful, children want to connect with peers their age.

7. Let them have personal days. Try not to let your children make a habit of this, but letting them have a day off every now and then will give them a break from being so stressed.

8. Remind them the bullying isn’t their fault. It’s easy for bullied children to put the blame on themselves for being “different”, but let them know there’s no shame in being bullied.

9. If the bullying continues, get the principal involved. This gives you a chance to be direct and ask why the situation hasn’t been handled properly. At this point, there’s no need to beat around the bush, as both you and your child deserve an answer.

10. When communicating with teachers and principals, let your child get their side of the story out. It shows you care about their perspective and feelings.

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