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With researchers widely reporting the benefits of tea for reducing the risk of developing cancer, high blood pressure and even the common cold, tea can a great addition to a healthy life. But the endless options on the market can make choosing the right one an intimidating process.

Tea is not just a soothing drink to drown out a stressful day’s work, but it also has powerful antioxidants which target free radicals in the body – these are major contributors to the development of disease – and studies show this may play a role not only in reducing the risk of various ailments, but may also slow down the ageing process.

Lifestyle, environmental and diet choices, such as smoking, drinking too much alcohol or skimping on regular exercise, are some of the main causes of oxidative stress; a state in which there is an imbalance of free radicals in the body. This imbalance can damage our DNA and could eventually lead to a number of health conditions, including:

  1. High blood pressure
  2. Diabetes
  3. Inflammation
  4. Heart disease
  5. Cancer

Research on green tea consumption found that regularly drinking the beverage has a proven reduction in cellular damage and it proved that the antioxidants, specifically polyphenols, in the tea trapped the free radicals, leading to a decrease in oxidative stress.

tea health
Photo Credit: Matthew Henry on Unsplash

It is clear that tea is a powerful aid to maintaining good health and, although tea may not cure illnesses, it can offer some relief and lessen the burden of some symptoms. Below is a list of some beneficial teas and what they can do – find out which one is right for you.

Camomile Tea

Best for

  • Managing blood sugar levels
  • Aiding sleep regulation
  • Reducing inflammation

Camomile has a long history of uses dating back to ancient times when it was highly esteemed throughout Europe and Asia for its many healing properties. Today, this tea is most popularly known as a calming drink, often recommended to those with jittery nerves. However, it has also been found to reduce inflammation – which is a major contributor to the development of conditions like high blood pressure, arthritis or even skin ailments like eczema. Some studies have also found that this tea can help manage blood sugar levels.

chamomile tea
Photo Credit: Vitolda Klein on Unsplash

Peppermint Tea

Best for

  • Indigestion
  • Bloating

The cooling and refreshing flavour and smell of this tea prove that it’s for good reason that so many products, including toothpaste, sweets and gum, use mint as a main ingredient. But the taste alone is not where peppermint tea’s best qualities lie.

Recognised for its benefits in reducing the pain of indigestion and bloating, this tea can be a great option for those with digestive issues. However, studies show that if one’s symptoms stem from GERD, this tea could further irritate the condition, but those suffering from IBS symptoms may find relief with peppermint, according to previous research.

Peppermint tea
Photo Credit: Anton Darius on Unsplash

Liquorice Root Tea

Best for

  • Supporting kidney and liver function
  • Reducing symptoms of respiratory illnesses

Liquorice root is in fact the same plant that the beloved confectionary liquorice is derived from, and unsurprisingly, the tea has a natural sweetness to it. Studies have found that the oleanolic and asiatic acids in this tea make powerful antioxidants, which in turn can fight the symptoms of some respiratory conditions including colds and bronchitis, by protecting the cells in the lungs.

This study also shows that liquorice root tea contains antiviral, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. Though there is limited evidence, some believe this tea may reduce menopause symptoms such as hot flashes.

licorice tea
Liquorice root tea is known for its healing qualities.

Ginger Tea

Best for

  • Aiding digestion
  • Reducing inflammation
  • Reducing congestion

This antiviral tea can aid in pain relief for menstrual cramps, indigestion and bloating and is a popular choice for reducing cold symptoms, including congestion. Ginger also has powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, with one study reporting 5% less oxidative stress-related kidney damage in the subjects that consumed ginger than those that didn’t.

Ginger tea
Photo Credit: Julia Topp on Unsplash

Green Tea

Best for

  • Skin health
  • Antioxidants

This aromatic beverage is a powerful option and its health benefits are a force to be reckoned with, ranging from aiding digestion, boosting brain function and supporting skin health. The antioxidants found in green tea are a driving force for preventing cancer and inflammation. This tea may also fight halitosis – studies have found green tea reduced the severity of bad breath by inhibiting the growth of bacteria.

green tea
Green tea is packed with antioxidants.

Nettle Tea

Best for

  • Reducing inflammation
  • Bone health

This tea, sourced from the stinging nettle plant, is a nutritional powerhouse, providing doses of calcium, magnesium and phosphorus and it also contains all the nine essential amino acids. Like the other teas on this list, nettle tea provides free radical-fighting antioxidants which are vital for maintaining healthy cells and preventing the development of many illnesses.

Nettle tea
Photo Credit: Debby Hudson on Unsplash

While these choices all provide a range of health benefits, it is important to remember not all teas are safe for everyone and some teas may interact with one’s medication and, as such, it’s always best to check with your physician before making any dietary changes.

 

 

A stranger’s cold eyes, pursed lips, scrunched-up nose and serious brows can leave us feeling uncomfortable. Or perhaps you’ve felt at ease when encountering a warm, open face with kind eyes and an upturned mouth. Many of us subconsciously evaluate who to trust or who to avoid based on people’s facial features.

While we might not consider the root of such judgments, putting it down to intuition, we are inadvertently Face Reading. The study, officially known as physiognomy, pinpoints the exact facial features that correspond with an individual’s personality, and proves to be more than just intuition. It is rooted in ancient studies and has served communities dating back as early as the Zhou dynasty in China. 

According to this practice, an auspicious face, which can be categorised by big earlobes, a plump chin, straight nose and a full forehead, can mean this person will lead a prosperous and successful life. By comparison, a face with a flat philtrum – the space between the nose and upper lip, a small chin and a blemished or scarred forehead foretells a life marred with health, relationship and financial difficulties. Chinese physiognomy holds that a person’s past is reflected on their face and through analysing facial features their former and future experiences are revealed.

Like astrology and tarot reading, physiognomy is considered an alternate practice in the West. Despite the sceptical beliefs around these practices, Face Reading is not based on conjecture, as scientists have been studying the links between physiognomy and the way we perceive others, with some reports finding evidence that certain features can affect the way people see us.  Face Reading is even used for criminal profiling, with law enforcement agencies such as the FBI, using the practice to assist in reading suspects or offenders.

There are 12 main features including the ears, nose, lips, cheeks, jaw, chin, brows, mouth, eyes, eyebrows, forehead and hairline, with each corresponding to personality traits. Each facial feature is also thought to represent the health of our internal organs, with the forehead representing the liver, the nose linked to the heart and the ears linked to the kidneys.

facial features corresponding organs health
Facial features are believed to reflect the health of their corresponding internal organs.

The face is split between the left and right side, with the left side held to represent one’s personal life and true self. The right side reflects one’s public self that they project outwards. For example, if a person had a scar on their left side, this may indicate a distressing event in their personal life.

Although physiognomy is not a hard science and can’t be relied upon for profiling without further research, it remains a popular practice that is learned and applied not only by professionals, but also by lay people.

Here are some easy techniques to get started on the elements of Face Reading and what they mean:

Face shape:

There are 10 main face shapes in Chinese physiognomy, each reflecting different personalities, experiences and fortunes. Below are a few of the most common shapes.

  1. Round Face Shape: This shape describes a round, plump face and denotes a kind and compassionate individual who is easy-going and accommodating. Known as the ‘water’ type face, it is thought that the owner of this face is optimistic and has a gentle, kind nature.
  2. Square face shape: This type is thought to be an analytical, logical and smart individual. Also known as the ‘metal’ face, this type is domineering and can be overbearing or stubborn, but is believed to have a good sense of humour.
  3. Long face shape: This face shape denotes a hardworking type who is practical and organised. They may be short-tempered, prickly and difficult to communicate with. This is the ‘wood’ type face, and it is held that the owner of this face may struggle with relationships due to their nature.
  4. Triangular face shape: This type describes a face with a narrow forehead and large jaw. They are considered kind, genuine and family-oriented.
Face shape round long square
Face shapes from left to right: round face, long face and square face.

Eyebrows:

Eyebrows are believed to represent one’s fortune from age 31-34, along with reflecting emotions and one’s familial relationships. In general, auspicious eyebrows are considered those that are long enough to cover the eyes, are aligned with the brow bone and have smooth hair.

  1. Curved: The owners of these eyebrows are described as warm, open and friendly people. They are strong communicators and enjoy working with others.
  2. Straight: Individuals with these eyebrows are considered serious and direct, with a business-minded approach to life. They have a short temper and can be stubborn. They have a strong ability to focus and are not the type you’d find struggling with procrastination.
  3. Angled: This type indicates an impatient and ambitious individual who likes to be in control. They make good leaders, and are highly competitive. This type is advised to keep their temper in check to avoid hurting others.
face reading straight eyebrows
Straight eyebrows (pictured) are believed to reflect a serious person.

Eyes:

The eyes have long been referred to as the window to the soul, and according to physiognomists, it is for good reason. The shape and positioning of one’s eyes are believed to indicate a person’s open or reserved nature.

  1. Closely set eyes: These eyes refer to those that are positioned closer together, and indicate an independent, strong-willed and possibly stubborn individual.
  2. Wide-set eyes: Those with wide-set eyes are believed to be adventurous and thoughtful types who think outside the box.
  3. Upward-turned eyes: Someone with these eyes is thought to be an inquisitive and ambitious individual. They are held to be optimists who are able to get a hold of, and make the most of, opportunities.
  4. Downward-turned eyes: The owners of these eyes are more prone to pessimism and negative rumination. However, they are believed to be kind, thoughtful and helpful to those around them.
  5. Deep-set eyes: People with deep-set eyes are observant and attentive and have a mysterious image. They are reserved and often hold people at an arm’s length before getting to know them. They may take a while to open up and struggle with authentic self-expression.
  6. Protruding eyes: Those with this eye type are considered to be erratic and impulsive, with a strong passion for fun ad adventure. They are thought to enjoy attention and validation from others.

Sanpaku Eyes:

Do you have these unlucky eyes? Sanpaku eyes describes eyes with three visible whites; referring to the visible sclera of the eyes. While this term is Japanese, it is a culturally widespread and deep-rooted belief that this eye type is a bad omen.

Most commonly, people have only two white spaces visible in their eyes, those to the right and left of the iris. But when the sclera below or above the eyes are also visible, these are considered Sanpaku eyes. With the white below the iris visible, the owner of these eyes is considered to be an unlucky person, and someone who will suffer exceptionally through their lives.

Many renowned figures with calamitous experiences have had these inauspicious eyes, including Princess Diana, Michael Jackson and James Dean, who all had whites visible below the iris. On the other hand, people with whites visible above the iris are believed to cause suffering to those around them.

sanpaku eyes
Sanpaku eyes, also known as ‘three-white eyes’, pictured above.

Mouth:

As the corresponding facial feature of the stomach, the mouth represents materialism, sexual attraction, but also love and friendship.

  1. Big mouth: People with this type tend to be healthy, influential and passionate. They are well-liked and charismatic and may have luck in the financial aspects of life.
  2. Small mouth: These individuals are usually more conservative and reserved. They struggle to express their feelings and tend to be timid in relationships.
  3. Upturned mouth: This type represents an optimistic and enthusiastic person who is usually popular and well-liked. They are motivated and driven and this generally leads to financial security and success and their lives.
  4. Down-turned mouth: This mouth indicates a prideful and rigidly- principled individual who can be stubborn. On the other hand, they are hard-working, courageous and are dedicated to overcome challenges in their lives.
  5. Crooked mouth: People with crooked mouths tend to suffer from stomach problems. If the right side is crooked, then these individuals are thought to be witty, talkative and passionate. On the other hand, a left-side crooked mouth indicates a pessimistic, worn-out person who is likely to hold grudges against others.

Lips:

  1. Thick lips: These lips indicate a pragmatic, friendly and sentimental individual. They are positive and considerate, but have a tendency of making impulsive decisions and are prone to getting misled by others.
  2. Thin lips: People with this type tend to be witty, realistic and straightforward. They can also be stubborn, argumentative and like to exaggerate stories. They may lack responsibility and loyalty.
  3. Thick upper lip and thin lower lip: This combination represents a caring, loyal and devoted individual who is observant and considerate of others’ problems. They believe in giving, rather than taking.
  4. Thin upper lip and thick lower lip: This type indicates a dependent person, who lacks self-regulation skills and may overly rely on the help and support of others around them.
lips big small face reading chinese
Lip types pictured from left to right: thick lips, thin lips.

Nose:

The tip of the nose is held to represent a person’s financial luck in life, while the bridge of the nose reflects health.

  1. Fleshy nose tip: It is a generally held belief in physiognomy that the bigger the nose, the bigger the ego. But along with this comes with a strong inner world and a kind spirit.
  2. Small nose tip: This indicates a more prudent and reserved individual, with bad financial luck.
  3. High nose bridge: A straight nose bridge indicates good health, especially if there are no moles or scars. When the bridge is high, it represents a person who attracts wealth and has good luck in romantic relationships.
  4. Low nose bridge: A low bridge indicates low self-esteem and suggests those with this nose lack the confidence that those with higher and bigger noses are known for.
nose types
Types of nose tips pictured from left to right: small tip, fleshy tip.

These techniques can easily be applied to uncover what your face says about your fortune, health and past experiences. However, Chinese philosophy relies upon balance and, as such, for an effective reading, each facial feature should not be isolated, but rather, analysed with the rest of the face taken into consideration.

Spiritual healing practitioners, Yvette Clarke and Brenda Pitout, formed a unique alliance more than six years ago, successfully combining their individual abilities and together healing hundreds of clients who could not be helped by modern medicine – proving two heads and hearts are better than one and sometimes we’ve got to go deeper to achieve real change.

Sceptical but desperate clients with diverse conditions including addiction, trauma, anxiety, depression and eating disorders have come for and received “transformative” healing in the nurturing hands of this remarkable pair.

As a Clairvoyant and Light Worker, Yvette, is able to clearly see, hear and feel her client’s subconscious emotional blockages. Before finding Brenda, she felt powerless to help her clients heal the painful manifestations of these emotional blocks that she was able to discern.

With a, “nothing left to lose attitude”, Hayley, who was feeling depressed, anxious, suffering from insomnia and in deep despair, attended her first session with Yvette following the death of her grandfather.

 

“The first few appointments blew me away, as Yvette has the ability to see into what is going on in your system emotionally and what has or is causing it to happen.”

“She is able to read into and settle your system down with one of her amazing prayers,” explains Hayley.

Kylie first attended a session with Yvette 14 years ago describing it as, “the most unique and mind-blowing experience I have ever had.”

In this and subsequent sessions Kylie explains, “Yvette was spot on tuning into whatever was happening to me (emotionally, mentally, spiritually and physically) and understanding all the micro emotions that make up me, inspiring me with the confidence and skills to create the reality I truly desire.”

Yvette, a self-proclaimed “blunt practitioner”, is often compelled to reveal difficult but necessary information to her clients for healing to take place.

Rather than “leave me to just sit in my heightened emotional state,” Kylie explains, “Yvette would always provide options for further support and assistance.”

Before finding Brenda, however, Yvette often felt powerless to help her clients heal the painful manifestations of their emotional blocks.

In 2011 she found Brenda Pitout, “an astounding BodyTalk practitioner”, who was both capable and willing to use her clients’ notes to continue the healing process she had started.

“Really, it took over a decade to find Brenda, who unlike all others before her, was prepared to work with my findings and not dismiss them due to the restrictions of her healing modality or ego,” Yvette reflects.

Yvette sought Brenda’s help for excruciating endometriosis which was debilitating. After only a few sessions with Brenda, the symptoms dramatically improved. She also sought Brenda’s help to release a lifetime of trauma and anxiety.

“It was after this astounding healing experience, I began referring clients to Brenda to recalibrate, restructure and realise their own healing,” Yvette explains.

Yvette was now satisfied she could truly fulfil her manifesto of providing people with an “emotional channel for the higher good of humanity by shifting them out of their cycle of suffering and abuse.”

Yvette says clients often come to her when they are at their lowest and feel “all else is lost”. To conduct her session she must enter their sacred space (the room of their soul) and she will therefore only do this with permission.

Upon invitation she enters this space by tapping upon her song bowl that resonates with a strong and unwavering pitch that carries with it the anticipation of what a client’s soul room may reveal.

While immersed in the soul room, Yvette is able to pick out what she calls “the carrots from a stew” – the most relevant subconscious messages from which she scribes pages of notes that enlighten to the reason the client’s soul has presented to her on that day.

Brenda then uses these notes as a platform to optimise healing.

BodyTalk uses the body’s own innate wisdom to heal itself. I merely facilitate this process by using neuro muscular bio feedback and intuition to bring change to the governing blueprint through its healing priority,” explains Brenda.

She enters “The Zone (where she) interfaces the left brain’s pragmatic and practical knowledge with the right side’s intuition to bring about shifts of consciousness.”

“Tapping on the brain enables us to focus on reprogramming of formula and tapping on the sternum enables access to the heart and storage of the information,” she continues.

Brenda discovered the BodyTalk healing modality in desperate pursuit to end her own intermittent battle with depression and her daughter’s suffering with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

She believed this cured them both and was her impetus to train in the modality – “something anyone can learn”. She is now dedicated to the ‘ongoing study of humanity at the “University of Life”’.

The healing duo have given hope, health and happiness to hundreds of clients with a broad spectrum of ails, healing where modern medicine had failed.

“It’s ‘Out There’, but it works,” excites Doctor Matty Moore, MD FAAFP FACRRM EM Cert, who, once sceptical, last year sought immediate resolution of issues that counselling and therapy could not provide. Unfamiliar to his Western Medical training, he tried to remain open and allowed Yvette to “identify” blockages and Brenda to “rewire” his subconscious.

“My repair was immediate, dynamic, and life-changing, for which I am enormously grateful,” says Dr Moore.

The practitioners describe distance and time as “mere concepts”, so when Yvette referred Hong Kong residents, Sean and Evania, who had “tried everything and had nothing to lose”, their sessions, unlike any other therapies previously tried, provided “immediate and life changing results”.

“Whilst cliché, Yvette and Brenda have made a huge improvement to both of our lives which we never thought possible and we would highly recommend both of them,” says Evania and Sean.

A curious Perth Psychologist, recently experiencing relationship issues, gushes about an “astonishing first session with Brenda resulting in profound shifts in thinking and feeling.”

“The combination of a skilled and warm therapist delivering a kick-arse modality was a winning formula for me,” she says.

A major depressive disorder, severe anxiety and an eating disorder had “steadily consumed”, dubious but desperate scientist, Lauren, for many years who was “sold” after her first session with Brenda.

“An expert practitioner, she navigates the blueprint of your body and mind with the precision of a skilled surgeon to find, and hand you, the key to self-love, acceptance and your full potential,” she says. “She achieved for me what an army of GPs, psychologists, psychiatrists and medication were not able to. She saved my life. It’s as simple as that.”

“An expert practitioner, she navigates the blueprint of your body and mind with the precision of a skilled surgeon to find, and hand you, the key to self-love, acceptance and your full potential.”

Seven years ago a desperate young female on the residential rehabilitation wait-list for addiction to crystal meth-amphetamine, conquered a lifetime of addiction and eating disorders with Brenda, later herself qualifying as a BodyTalk Practitioner and Nutritionist.

While their clients present with varied physical conditions, Brenda identifies consistencies in their underlying emotional causes.

Testament to the success of their relationship, built on mutual admiration and skill collaboration, after six years, Yvette and Brenda continue to join their hearts and heads together to identify then rewire subconscious blockages and optimise healing outcomes for their clients.

For more information contact clairvoyant Yvette Clarke yvetteleahclarke@gmail.com or BodyTalk practitioner Brenda Pitout bodytalkwa@gmail.com