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Different types of ingredients need to be considered when tackling skin concerns such as, dry, ageing or mature, oily, acne prone and dull skin.

Being mindful of what is both good for your skin and

what is bad will determine the right product for you.

For example, alcohol in some products can dry out the skin and although collagen is crucial in the ageing process when naturally produced by the body, applied topically, it hardly does anything for anti-ageing, at best it aids in hydration. Rather, what you need is an ingredient that aids in collagen production such as, Retinol or Rosehip oil.

Selecting a skin care product based on its ingredients is a crucial step to aid in the health of one’s skin.

Skincare ingredients to look for:

1. Hyaluronic acid (applied topically)

Suitable for:
  •  All to dry skin types
  • Sensitive and oily skin
  •  The perfect allrounder
Benefits:
  • Hydration
  •  Promotes healthier supple skin, reduces the appearance of wrinkles, redness, dermatitis
  • Has a key role in wound healing due to its antibacterial properties
Tips:
  • Apply after toner and serums
  • Apply with already damp skin so that it retains moisture
  • Hyaluronic acid will not work to its best ability if the face is not damp

2. Rosehip oil (applied topically)

Suitable for:
  • Dry skin
  • Mature skin
Benefits:
  • Boosts naturally occurring collagen to create skin elasticity and firmness
  • Hydrates with the help of fatty acids (linoleic) which strengthen the cell walls of the skin and supports retain water

 A dry not greasy oil, that easily absorbs into the skin

  • Helps reduce scars and fine lines, hyperpigmentation, sun exposure and hormonal changes
  •  High percentages or vitamins A and C (benefits for these shown below)
  •  Boosts naturally occurring collagen levels to help increase skin elasticity and firmness
  •  Full of antioxidants and antibacterial properties (phenols)

Tips:
  • Make sure to keep it out of sunlight and warmer temperatures
  •  Use as the last step of a skincare routine, before bed
  •  If your foundation is to dry often one to two drops of Rosehip oil gives a youthful glow without greasiness, preventing the skin becoming dehydrated from the makeup
Fun fact:

Derived from Rosa Canina – a rose bush from Chile.  It is different from rose oil which comes from rose petals and derives from the pressed fruit and seeds of the plant (Rosa Canina).

3. Caffeine (applied topically)

Suitable for:
  • Red, puffy, and sensitive skin
  • Dark under eye circles
  •  Mature skin
Benefits:
  • Calming (opposite to drinking coffee)
  • Reduces the appearance of dark under eye circles
  • Rich in antioxidants
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Antibacterial
  • Helps reduce the appearance of sunspots and appearance of fine lines
Tips:
  • Keep cool and store in a darkly lit space
Fun Fact:

Coffee grounds can be used as a skin exfoliator or mixed with a little olive oil – an exfoliating mask.

4. Zinc (applied topically)

Suitable for:
  • Acne prone skin types
Benefits:
  •  Helps clear acne-causing bacteria from skin
  • Helps reduce oil production
  • Reduces acne and acne scaring
  • Anti-inflammatory properties helping reduce redness and irritation
  • Can be used to aid other skin conditions such as melasma, rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis and eczema
Tips:
  • Spot test first
  •  Use as a serum for best results

5. Vitamin C (applied topically)

Suitable for:
  • Sun damage
  • Mature skin
  • Dull skin
  • Hyperpigmentation
Benefits:
  • Reduces wrinkles
  • Helps protect against sun damage
  • Reduces hyperpigmentation
  • Evens out skin tone
  • Brightening
  • Aids in the healing of wounds
  • Creates a barrier against pollution
Tips:

  • Use both morning and night and for best results, after toner and before moisturiser

Do not combine Vitamin C and Retinol (Vitamin A) as it can reduce the other’s effects/neutralise each other

  •  Vitamin C can be found in face wash/cleansers, moisturisers, sunscreen even some powders, if you are the type of person who has no time for an elaborate routine try and use it in combination with something else

 The dryer the skin, the lower the percentage of vitamin C should be used, to solve this dilute in moisturiser

  • If the serum or product starts to change colour (oxidising) throw it away
Fun fact:

Once applied Vitamin C cannot be easily wiped or washed off thus, missing applications will not be too detrimental to overall result. It also works in combination with SPF (not as a replacement) to boost skins protection against the sun.

6. Vitamin A/Retinol  (applied topically)

Suitable for:
  • Mature skin
Benefits:
  • Stimulates the production of new skin cells (creatingnew skin)
  • Can help production of collagen
  • Speeds up the skin turnover process which in turns reduces the signs of wrinkles, dark spots, fine lines and acne
  • Promotes a radiant glow
Tips:
  • Well known for causing irritation at the beginning of use, it is advised to spot test and apply with care(symptom such as, dryness, itchiness, redness and increased sensitivity can occur)

When eased into softly (I.e applied less frequently increasing gradually, less irritation is likely to occur

  • If the above symptoms persist an alternative method would be retinal also called reinaldehyde or bakuchiol which appear to cause less irritation than retinol
Fun fact:

Vitamin A and Retinol are the same thing and has the best scientific evidence of anti-ageing.

Final Notes

Anti-ageing products are often left to too late, from early twenties onwards an anti-ageing ingredient should be implemented into the skincare regime as a form of prevention rather than used to fix the problem.

For oily skin types, it is still necessary to hydrate it. Often the production of excess oil is due to the skin trying to rehydrate itself, thus helping this process should slow down the production of oil. Sometimes choosing products that stop oil adds to the problem, it is better to choose something lightweight and hydrating. However if symptoms are excessive its advised to see a health professional.

 

Mornings are hard! With the help of our readers, we have put together a list of tips and tricks to help your mornings run smoother.

There was a time, before kids, when you could wake up at a leisurely pace, pee in peace, drink your coffee hot, shower as long as you liked and still make it to work on time. Now, you’re lucky if you remember to brush your teeth!

We hear you. If you’re looking for more peace and less fuss in the mornings, check out these tried-and-true tips and tricks from some of our readers.

The Night Before

• Lay out clothes (yours and theirs) the night before.

• Prepare and pack lunches and put them in the fridge to be packed into school bags the next morning.

• Make some grab-n-go breakfasts if you’ve got the time and/or inclination. Muffins and granola bars tend to work really well.

• Get enough sleep. Kids generally need between 10-12 hours at night, while you need 7-8 on average.

Take Care of Yourself First

We cannot recommend this highly enough. Waking up 10-15 minutes earlier than the kids should give you enough time to do the following:

• Drink a big glass of water.

• Get showered and do your hair / make-up.

• Have some coffee (One mum suggests pairing this with some Cadbury’s Chocolate Fingers. We don’t disagree.)

• If you’re feeling extra brave, try waking up an hour earlier to meditate and start the day off right.

Waking Them Up

Try these at your own peril.

• Start the day with a hug. This lets them know they are loved and puts them in a good mood.

• Sing loudly as you’re walking through the house on your way to their room. By the time you arrive, they’ll be wide-awake. Grumpy, sure. But awake!

• For older children, put their alarm at the other side of their room so that they have to get out of bed to turn it off.

• Let older children be responsible for getting themselves up on time. If they’re not ready, then they’ll learn from that.

• If your kid is really upset about going to school, it might be worth talking to their teacher and checking that nothing is going on that you should be concerned about.

Morning Procedure

• Get dressed AFTER having breakfast to avoid having to get changed if there are any accidents or spillages.

• Use a checklist so that they know what they need to do. Little kids who can’t yet read can use picture reminders (toothbrush, clothes, cereal bowl, etc.)

• Parents should be sharing morning duties between them; one getting the kids fed while the other gets them organised/dressed.

• Give yourself more time than you need. If you allocate the time in advance for any accidents, tantrums or spills, you won’t go into panic-mode when they happen.

• Limit time on showers and have an agreement on who will use the bathroom first, while the others have their breakfast.

• No TV in the morning. It’s too much of a distraction, and they won’t want to leave before the end of their show.

Getting Them Out The Door

•  Leave on time, even if they’re not 100% ready. They’ll soon learn to hustle.

• Do a quick tidy-up before you leave. It’ll make coming home in the evening much more restful if you’re walking into a reasonably clean house.

• If they are late because they refused to get out of bed or dawdled in the morning, let them take responsibility and tell the teacher themselves.

The most important thing is to relax. Kids will usually take their cue from you. If you’re stressed out and panicked, chances are they will be too. So, take a deep breath. Things don’t always go the way we plan, and that’s okay.

Mumma, you’re doing fine.

Feminism is a loaded word in today’s society yet it’s crucial to approach it as ‘gender equality’ to your kids before they hear it as anything else.

Below are 6 tips for raising little feminists who believe in the diverse representation of women and uniform rights for all.

1. Start a conversation

First of all, sit your kids down and open with the direct line, “Have you ever heard of feminism?” If they are young, chances are they haven’t and you can start with a clean canvas. But if they have, let them say what they think. Then direct them towards the ideals of gender equality, such as anybody’s right to voice an opinion regardless of sex or be open to the same job promotions if they are doing well at work. Ask, “But isn’t this a lot like what feminism aims to do?” And voilà. You have your starting point.

2. Give it a clear definition

Make sure your kids understand that feminism is not ‘man-hating’. It means the economic, social, political and personal equality between boys and girls. This means they will be paid the same for the identical job, possess the same opportunities to pursue different interests and share the same right for their bodies to be respected. It means freedom to discover and express personal identities without limitations like ‘boys don’t cry’ and ‘ladies don’t do that’.

https://www.offspringmagazine.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/little-smiles-in-girls-fashion_4460x4460.jpg

3. Show real-life examples of sexism

An inevitable part of parenting is heightening your child’s awareness of our society and its many problems. Try starting small with fictitious examples such as, “If Bob picks two apples and Jane picks two apples, don’t you think they should be paid the same?” Or, “Bob likes playing with toy trucks. Jane likes it too. Do you think they should play together?” Then expand these to real-life examples your child has experienced or possibly will in the future

4. Be a role model

Use your own home to teach real gender equality – nothing impacts your child more than their personal environment. Share household chores between different sexes of the family, like having dad cook and mum do the dishes. Let everybody have a fair say during discussions, such as whereabouts the family’s next vacation should take place. Practice empathy during situations of conflict to highlight how everyone’s opinion is valid and valuable.

5. Defy stereotypes

Choosing your own clothes, hairstyle or the colour of your bedroom is a kind of empowerment crucial for self-confidence. Defy stereotypes by letting your son have longer hair or your daughter wear shorts. Promote positive body image and show them to respect how other children choose to express themselves by only saying stuff they would want to hear themselves and not touching others without permission.

6. Monitor their entertainment

Finally, be aware of possible sexist values embedded in everything your child is watching or reading. Do not underestimate this! In Thomas the Tank Engine, depictions of female trains often fall along the lines of, “Wise and older Edward always had good advice for Emily, who really is a very nice engine but who can be a bit bossy.” Instead, choose books and family movies that have a healthy depiction of both male and female heroes such as Disney favourites Frozen and Moana or TV show The Legend of Korra.